Changyucheng Walled Village | A gate in the old barracks walls
A gate in the old barracks walls.

Changyucheng Walled Village and the High Tower

Hike by a village reservoir and follow forest trails up into the mountains, heading for the High Tower on a tall peak. We’ll return to the village for a restaurant lunch, and then explore the village, visiting the temple and checking out the the walls and arches of an old Ming Dynasty-era military barracks.

Level 4
4–5 hours start to finish over 11km (Can I do it?)
Book your place
Bookings close December 6

Booking info

Wednesday, December 7

¥450 / ¥405 for members

  1. 7:30am departure from the Liangmaqiao subway area
  2. 8:00am departure from the Lido Metropark Hotel Starbucks
Includes a meal at a village restaurant
Pay on the day of the hike. More about payments

Important!—To get into the village/Great Wall area you will need to show a green result on your Health Kit/健康宝 app and show recent covid test results.

There’s a risk of getting a Health Kit pop-up from hiking here

We hike up close to the Hebei-Beijing border, and your phone might pick up a Hebei signal.

Putting your phone in airplane mode while hiking should take care of it, but we can’t guarantee that.

If it’s very important that you don’t get a pop-up, we advise saving this hike for another time.

Deep in the mountains of Changping District is Changyucheng, a village that used to be a Ming Dynasty-era military barracks. On this visit we’ll follow easy trails in the forest and mountains behind the village reservoir, hike up a big hill to the ‘High Tower’, and then walk back down to the village for a meal before exploring the village to see stone houses, the village temple, and the stone walls of the old barracks.

The hike

We start off with a warmup walk up the main street of the village, and then out to the reservoir. Stairs lead up past the dam of the reservoir, and we’ll then follow a short boardwalk around the reservoir to the forest.

The reservoir is the start and finish of a loop walk up into the mountains.

By the reservoir
By the reservoir. (Click for larger image)

We’ll begin the loop by walking up through birch forest, following a paved trail up into a valley. The trail rises slowly for the first part, and then begins to zig-zag as the hills get steeper. Eventually we’ll be out of the forest and up on to a clear ridge where we’ll pass a tablet that marks the Beijing-Hebei border.

The views from the tablet include the reservoir and village far below, mountains all around, and a freshly planted line of wind turbines.

After a rest we’ll head on and up, following an easy trail through the hills. The trail is broad and well-formed, with views of Great Wall on faraway peaks.

The trail forks after about 30 minutes of easy walking. One fork leads up to the High Tower, and the other leads back down to the village.

Today we’re heading up to the High Tower, one of the highest Great Wall towers in Beijing. The tower is on fairly prominent peak, and sits at an elevation of around 1,440m above sea level.

Views of the big climb up to the High Tower
Views of the big climb up to the High Tower. (Click for larger image)

The trail to the top is on a well-formed trail with super views of mountains all around, and if it’s a clear day you’ll easily spot Beijing city through one of the gaps in the hills.

From the top you’ll have views on two sides of Great Wall disappearing into the mountains. Keen eyes might spot the Stone Valley Great Wall far below, which is one of our favourite ‘wild’ Great Wall hikes.

It’s a reasonably difficult climb up to the tower, and we’ll take our time on the way up.

We’ll also take a nice long break up top, as long as it’s not too chilly.

When it’s time to head down, we’ll follow the same track back down to the fork in the trail, and then down the fork and back to the reservoir.

The trail back down from the fork has some steep stairs to start, and then turns into a gravel track. We’ll hike out past the reservoir and back to the village.

After a hot meal at one of the village restaurants, we’ll have time to explore the village.

The village

The village temple
The village temple. (Click for larger image)

In the 1520s, this village was an important military base. The village was encircled by stone walls, some leading up the steep hills of the valley, and some of the arched entries and exits still remain. The thickness of the remaining walls give some indication of the level of fortification, and the importance of securing this pass, a sort-of shortcut around the heavily fortified Badaling mountain pass.

As well as the old walls, the village has several other sights to see: an old shrine which is alleged to cause difficulties for cameras; a restored-but-usually-closed temple with a large bell inside, and a giant old tree just outside the temple entrance.

Because of the COVID-19 situation we have some extra terms and conditions for participation.

In particular:

  • DO NOT participate if you are sick or showing symptoms of fever and/or have an elevated temperature, or have been in close contact with someone who was.
  • DO NOT participate if you have not completed any required quarantine after your return to Beijing.
  • You MUST agree to the mitigation and prevention measures outlined here and that Beijing Hikers will not be held responsible if any participants become sick.

Please read in full here: Operating hikes under COVID-19 precautions

Related content

Photos and trip reports: Changyucheng Walled Village and the High Tower

  1. Changyucheng Walled Village, 2021/04/18

    Changyucheng Walled Village, 2021/04/18

    Changyucheng is a village that grew up around a Ming Dynasty-era barracks, and on this visit we hiked hill trails and valleys behind the village reservoir before taking a look around some of the remaining fortifications—see 13 photos from the hike and walkabout in the village.

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