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Special trip photos - Journey from the West, 2011/10

In the classic of Chinese literature ‘Journey to the West,’ the monk Xuanzang (and the Monkey King) passed through Gansu and Xinjiang on the way to India, following the northern Silk Road.

The story was based on actual events, although it took Xuanzang 17 years to complete the trip there and back. Our journey (from the west) took us seven days, travelling by jeep along the stretch of the Silk Road between Turpan and Jiayuguan. If we'd been on camels it may have taken longer.

Highlights included the Flaming Mountains and the Jiaohe Ancient City of Turpan, the Han Dynasty Great Wall in the Gobi Desert, the fortress of Jiayuguan that marks the western end of the Ming Dynasty Great Wall, the Buddhist cave art of Dunhuang’s Mogao Grottoes, and a night camping in the desert.

A view of the rammed earth walls, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

A view of the rammed earth walls of the Jiaohe Ancient City Ruins near Turpan. The city was abandoned in 1300 after being attacked by the Mongol army.

One of the larger structures, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

One of the larger structures in the Jiaohe Ancient City.

Part of the city, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Part of the city was used for living; other parts for pottery factories, government buildings, barracks, and temples.

a stupa forest, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

The ancient city included a stupa forest – a big one in the middle, four groups of 25 on each corner.

A mosque in Turpan, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

A mosque in Turpan looks quite busy.

the site of Buddhist cave art, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

We drove into the Flaming Mountains to find the site of Buddhist cave art.

Taking a break, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Taking a break at the Bezeklik 1,000 Buddha Caves.

a short hike up, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

We took a short hike up into the hills above the caves.

the valley, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

A view down the valley.

Some rode camels, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Some rode camels up to the top.

More camels, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

More camels.

a good view of the rising sun, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

On the second day of the trip we camped on the fringes of the Gobi Desert. The next morning we had a good view of the rising sun.

some interesting stones and rocks, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

After breakfast, we took a walk in the desert. This part of the Gobi is a rocky desert, and we found some interesting stones and rocks along the way.

tasty-looking Chinese food, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

At our next stop, Hami, we visited one of the museums. They had an interesting display of tasty-looking Chinese food – all made from rocks and stones!

Quite a banquet, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Quite a banquet, if you’re able to eat rocks.

a 3,000-year old mummy, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

The museum also contained a 3,000-year old mummy.

the local musical tradition of Muqam, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Next door to the museum with the rocks and mummy was another museum dedicated to the local musical tradition of Muqam. There are some Muqam performances that go on for days, literally. We opted for the 30-minute version!

a picnic in the desert, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

On the way to Dunhuang we stopped for a picnic in the desert. While the food was being prepared, we stretched our legs with a walk in the nearby hills.

Barren, rocky hills, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Barren, rocky hills all the way to the south.

our picnic, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

We set up tables and chairs for our picnic.

Han Dynasty (206BC) Great Wall, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Closer to Dunhuang, we stopped to investigate some Han Dynasty (206BC) Great Wall.

the Han Dynasty Great Wall has been eroded by weathering, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Built from rammed earth, some of the Han Dynasty Great Wall has been eroded by weathering. If it rained more in this area, there wouldn’t be much left at all. Most of the damage here is done by wind and blowing sand.

Han Dynasty Great Wall, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Eroded Han Dynasty Great Wall.

in the tall, wavy grass, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

We spotted the Beijing Hikers red ribbons in the tall, wavy grass.

a group shot, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

We stopped for a group shot.

Fields of melons, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Fields of melons!

some melons, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

The friendly farmer gave us some melons to try. We ate them for dessert later that night – tasty!

The Mogao Grottoes, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

The Mogao Grottoes were one of the highlights of the trip – hundreds of caves filled with beautiful Buddhist art and statues. To preserve the caves, only a few are open at a time. Because we were visiting during a big holiday, more of the caves were open than usual.

take a few shots from outside, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Cameras aren’t allowed inside the caves, so we could only take a few shots from outside.

a bit of hiking over the sand dunes, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

On our second day in Dunhuang, we set out for a bit of hiking over the sand dunes.

a small village, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

We walked through a small village.

the dunes, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Heading for the dunes.

Climbing uphill, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Climbing uphill – quite tough work.

the first ridge, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Arriving at the first ridge.

enjoy the views, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

After climbing to the top of this ridge we took a break to enjoy the views.

a well-known tourist location, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Down below, Crescent Lake – quite a well-known tourist location.

the orange boots, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

It turned out that the orange boots were rented from the park – quite a surreal sight.

Crescent Lake, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

A view of Crescent Lake.

The moon, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

The moon rose above the dunes.

the camel ride area, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

On the way out, we passed the camel ride area.

Hundreds of camels, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Hundreds of camels.

Heading on to Jiayuguan, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Heading on to Jiayuguan, we passed the Two Towers Reservoir, a lake of stunningly blue water in the desert.

the western-most end of the Ming Dynasty Great Wall., Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Approaching Jiayuguan Fortress, the western-most end of the Ming Dynasty Great Wall.

The fortress was well-guarded, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

The fortress was well-guarded.

A fight broke out between the guards, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

A fight broke out between the guards; curious passersby swiftly fled.

one of the large gates, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

A view through one of the large gates in the fortress wall.

Our drivers, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Our drivers managed to talk their way in without having to buy tickets.

inside the fortress, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Taking a break inside the fortress.

a trap for tourists, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

This part of the fortress was a trap for any attackers. They’d be let into the courtyard, the doors would slam shut, and archers would shoot from above. Nowadays, it’s a trap for tourists!

The famous ‘One Brick Left’, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

The famous ‘One Brick Left’: the architect of the fortress was asked to estimate the number of bricks required to build it all. The official in charge was skeptical, so the architect added one brick to the estimate. After all was done, there was one brick left.

The western gate of the fortress, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

The western gate of the fortress. If you were banished from China, you’d leave from this gate, never to return.

took a look at some more Great Wall, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

After visiting the fortress, we took a look at some more Great Wall nearby.

Han Dynasty Great Wall, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Pictured is Han Dynasty Great Wall, privately repaired using old techniques.

see what we could see, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

We climbed up to the top to see what we could see.

Four of the group, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

Four of the group.

The Hikers flag, Beijing Hikers JourneyFromWest,October01, 2011

The Hikers flag made an appearance.

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