Cuandixia Ming Village | The complicated 'cuan' character, seen on a wall of a courtyard house in the village
The complicated 'cuan' character, seen on a wall of a courtyard house in the village.

Cuandixia ‘Ming Village’ day trip

Spend the day out in Cuandixia, a Ming Dynasty-era village in the mountains west of Beijing – first a walk in the hills near the village, then a good look about the old courtyards, temples, and narrow lanes of the village itself.

Level 2+
Easy walking, mostly flat. (Can I do it?)
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Booking info

Private tour: Cuandixia ‘Ming Village’ day trip

From ¥600 per person

For cost details please see the table of prices and inclusions

On this hike you’ll get a good look around the alleys and courtyards of Cuandixia, a 500-year old Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) village that is sometimes referred to as a living museum.

We begin with a walk to explore the natural scenery in the hills near the village, before walking back for a big lunch in one of the village homes. After lunch you'll take a tour of the alleys, lanes, paved stairs, and courtyard houses, finishing with a walk up to a lookout in the hills above the village.

Prices and inclusions

Prices

* Discounts available for larger groups.
Group size 2 3 4 5-7 8-9 10+*
Price
per person
¥1,300 ¥1,000 ¥850 ¥750 ¥650 ¥600

Inclusions

English-speaking Beijing Hikers guide • Round-trip transport in private vehicle from central Beijing • Tickets and entry fees • Bottled water, snacks, lunch and drinks • Hiking sticks

Not included: surprise shopping trips.

More about Cuandixia

Hike in the hills opposite the village for a view from above
Hike in the hills opposite the village for a view from above. (Click for larger image)

The name of the village – ‘Cuandixia’ – translates roughly as ‘Below the cooking-stove’, which could be interpreted as meaning a good safe spot that’s hard to find. You’ll also find it on maps as ‘Chuandixia,’ as the character for Chuan () is much less complicated than that of Cuan ().

The village lies on the side of a hill on the old road between Beijing and Xi’an, and is made up of many well-preserved stone buildings, including about 70 courtyards.

The majority of these courtyards are now guesthouses, and the owners are usually happy enough to let people explore.

In the village we’ll find much history, with old Cultural Revolution slogans slowly fading on some of the walls, and art, stone, and wood work from the Qing and Ming Dynasties.

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